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Call for Proposals Now Open for 2015 NASC Symposium

Tue, 10/21/2014 - 08:51

The NASC is pleased to announce that the call for speaking proposals is now open for the 2015 NASC Sports Event Symposium. The event will take place April 27-30, 2015 in Milwaukee, WI. Proposals will be accepted through November 14, 2014.

Breakout sessions must include both a presentation (individual or panel) and a practical application exercise.  Each session is 60 minutes starting with 10 minutes for speaker introductions, sponsor recognition and announcements. Speakers will be required to stay at least 30 minutes at the conclusion of their session and conduct a small-group discussion on the topic for those attendees wishing to dive deeper into the topic.

Game Changer sessions, modeled after TED Talks, are an opportunity to present great ideas in 20 minutes or less. These short, powerful presentations will touch on the industry’s hottest issues in a focused environment.

Please note the following before submitting:

  • Deadline for submissions is Friday, November 14th.
  • All proposals must be submitted online.
  • All proposals must be completed in full.
  • You may submit a maximum of three proposals.

Click here to submit a proposal.


Categories: National

Discounted SportsBusiness Journal Subscription

Mon, 10/20/2014 - 15:28

The NASC is pleased to announce a special subscription rate for Street & Smith’s SportsBusiness Journal as our newest member benefit.

NASC  members who are not current or prior subscribers within the last 6 months, to Street & Smith’s SportsBusiness Journal, are eligible to receive a discounted introductory rate of $174. This is $90 off of the U.S. base rate of $264. NASC Canadian and International members who take advantage of this offer will receive a digital subscription, not a printed subscription. Upon the expiration of first subscription term at this special rate, the NASC member’s rate will change according to a SBJ renewal schedule.

To take advantage of this offer simply click here, select the one-year subscription option, and provide your member account number and delivery address.  You can find your member account number on the My Account page of www.SportsCommissions.org or you can request your account number at info@sportscommissions.org.

Please contact the Member Services Department at 513.842.8307 if you have any questions.


Categories: National

Mascot Mania: Making Community Connections

Mon, 10/06/2014 - 13:26

A mascot can be more than a tiger roaming the sidelines of a game, it can serve as an ambassador for year-round fan engagement.

Consider this: A couple of weeks ago, Texas A&M’s live mascot, Reveille, a female rough collie, was saved from impending injury when an A&M cadet stepped between her and an SMU receiver and blocked the receiver from crashing into the dog. That got a lot of airplay and, for the cadet, got him a free pair of senior boots worth more than $1,000, paid for by the commandant of the Corps for his heroism. (you can read a play by play breakdown of the best block of the game here: http://www.sbnation.com/college-football/2014/9/22/6827349/reveille-texas-am-mascot-ryan-kreider)

So, the mascot earned Texas A&M great publicity and connected the school with the community and sports fans everywhere.

Think about adding a mascot to do the same for your organization?

For example, Kentucky Speedway for years had  ‘Horsepower,’ its community mascot. (pictured) Horsepower would be part of many community events that might not have had a thing to do with auto racing, such as mascot broomball every winter. Horsepower also has led library reading programs, participated in flag football at halftime of NFL games and been part of mascot foot races at Cincinnati Reds games.

Even though Kentucky Speedway is a venue with a handful of events throughout the year, its mascot ‘Horsepower’ helped keep Kentucky Speedway in front of the community, and consumers, throughout the year by having a presence at events.

Libraries have mascot reading dogs. Recycle services have mascot recycle bins (really). The idea is less about developing an expensive mascot, and more about keeping your organization, sports commission or venue in front of the community 24/7, 365.

Remember, it’s your community that supports your group with sponsorships, volunteers and ticket sales. Having a mascot is a fun and simple way to engage the community on a year-round basis.


Categories: National

More than 200 sports tourism professionals in attendance at NASC Market Segment Meetings and CSEE Fall Module Held in Conjunction with USOC Olympic Sportslink

Thu, 10/02/2014 - 12:03

More than 200 NASC members gathered in Chicago, IL for the NASC semi-annual meeting from September 22-23, 2014. Hosted in conjunction with the USOC’s Olympic SportsLink conference, programming for the semi-annual meeting included: CSEE Fall 2014 Module, NASC Market Segment Meetings, and NASC Board of Directors meeting.

Daniel Diermeier, Ph. D., from the University of Chicago, presented the four-hour CSEE module on Crisis Management to 126 NASC members.  It focused on the key issues in a crisis situation and managing the flow of information.  After a 90 minute keynote presentation, attendees participated in a team activity that thrust them into a real-life crisis issue that grew beyond personal safety to include emotional issues and competing points of view. The session ended with a mock media conference and debriefing.  At the conclusion of the module, nine participants earned their CSEE credential.  The most recent class of certified sports event executives joins an elite group of only 140 sports tourism industry professionals across the country who share the CSEE credential. The next module will be held Monday, April 27th in Milwaukee, WI in conjunction with the 23rd annual NASC Sports Event Symposium.

The NASC Market Segment Meetings, created in 2006 to offer destinations with similar market size and organizational structure a platform to share ideas, was led by professional facilitator Adrian Segar. Over two days, 178 NASC members participated in discussions on the hottest topics  including local organizing committees, hotels, sports services, marketing/sponsorships, the bid process and bid fees, industry trends, facilities & facility management, economic impact, and creating your own events.

Additionally, the NASC Sports Legacy Committee announced Running Rebels Community Organization as the 2015 beneficiary of the NASC Sports Legacy Fund and kicked off the annual fundraiser with a 50/50 Split the Pot Raffle, raising nearly $500. The Sports Legacy committee’s goal is to raise $20,000 through a variety of activities to take place over the next six months with an emphasis placed on the silent auction and raffle to be held at the upcoming NASC Symposium.  Learn more about Running Rebels or how you can help leave a legacy.

At the conclusion of the Market Segment Meetings, the NASC board of directors held their monthly meeting. The agenda included reviewing the summer board action items, hearing updates from the retained earnings and hall of fame ad-hoc committees, sharing ideas and input on the marketing of the association to event rights holders and reviewing the 2014 mid-year membership survey results.  The NASC Board of Directors meets on a monthly basis via conference call and three times a year face-to-face.  If you are interested in applying for the 2015-2016 NASC Board of Directors to help lead the industry’s only not-for-profit association visit http://www.sportscommissions.org/About/Board-of-Directors/Nominations.

Current plans are to hold the 2015 NASC Market Segment Meetings in conjunction with the 2015 USOC SportsLink Conference. Dates and times for next year’s meetings will be announced in winter of 2015.


Categories: National

Security Rules Affect All Levels of Sport

Mon, 09/22/2014 - 15:31

We’re now entering our second year of the NFL’s “new” bag policy, and after the expected initial hue and cry over the rule change, fans seem to have settled into the new normal.

For those not initiated, the policy bans anything other than bags that are clear plastic, vinyl or PVC and do not exceed 12” x 6” x 12,” or one-gallon clear plastic freezer bag (Ziploc bag or similar).

Small clutch bags, approximately the size of a hand, with or without a handle or strap can be taken into the stadium with one of the clear plastic bag options.

Prohibited items include, but are not limited to: Purses larger than a clutch bag, coolers, briefcases, backpacks, fanny packs, cinch bags, seat cushions, luggage of any kind, computer bags and camera bags or any bag larger than the permissible size.

Now, Major League Baseball is also testing a tighter security entrance at the end of this season, setting up airport-like checkpoints at the entry. That will be the norm for all clubs in 2015.

College football stadiums also are beginning to follow the NFL model banning bags and oversized purses and backpacks of any kind and making sure everyone has a ticket.  And frankly, in this age of incidents at sports venues, very few people complain about the changes.

How does this impact your own event or venue? When you’re dealing with youth sports in particular, you can’t be too careful. But there’s a fine line between security and annoyance. The good news is, most everyone who attends some game, knows the drill and is familiar with purse checks, etc. It’s not like you have to reinvent the wheel.

As the NASC CSEE module this week drills down on security issues and crisis planning, it’s a good reminder to look at your own plans. Talk with your staff, with local security and others to get a sense on how to handle a crisis and how to plan to minimize the chance something can go wrong.

You can’t be too prepared for something you hope will never happen.

 


Categories: National

Website Launched for 23rd Annual NASC Symposium

Wed, 09/10/2014 - 15:41

The NASC is pleased to announce the launch of the new website for 23rd annual NASC Symposium, scheduled for April 27-30, 2015 in Milwaukee, WI., hosted by VISIT Milwaukee. The NASC Sports Event Symposium is the annual meeting for the only not-for-profit association for the sports tourism industry. For more than 20 years, the Symposium has been designed for sports tourism professionals by sports tourism professionals. Through a combination of industry-leading educational and business development opportunities, more than 800 Symposium attendees learn how to produce measurable ROI for their organization and advance their careers in the industry.

“The NASC board of directors, staff, and Symposium Committee are all very excited about the way the 2015 NASC Symposium is coming together,” said Beth Hecquet, CMP, CMM, Director of Meetings and Events.  “We are taking the feedback provided by our members and previous attendees and letting it guide us every step of the way.  You won’t want to miss it!”

On the website, you can download registration forms, view the preliminary schedule, find hotel & travel information, learn about sponsorship opportunities, and more.  Online registration will open for NASC members at the end of September.

Complete details are available at www.SportsCommissions.org/Symposium.

 

About the NASC

As the only trade association for the sports tourism industry, the National Association of Sports Commissions (NASC) is the most trusted resource for sports commissions, convention and visitors bureaus (CVBs), and sports event owners.

Since its establishment in 1992, the NASC has been committed to increasing the effectiveness of nearly 700 member organizations and more than 2,000 sports tourism professionals.

Our promise is to deliver quality education, ample networking opportunities, and exceptional event management and marketing know-how to our members and to protect the integrity of the industry.

 

 


Categories: National

Thoughts from the MPI World Education Conference

Tue, 08/19/2014 - 05:00

Ever think there are never enough hours in the day? Or that you’re the only person who returns emails on a regular basis? Don’t fret, you’re not the only one who deals with those issues, and more. At the Meeting Professionals International World Education Conference August 2-5 at Minneapolis, a number of speakers offered tips and suggestions on how to put on great meetings, no matter what the challenge.

One of the highlights of the opening day was the keynote by bestselling author Deepak Chopra, discussing his concept of “wellness real estate” and healthy indoor environments at the home, the office and where we meet. Related to his speech was the session, “Serve This, Not That,” on what we as meeting planners order from food & beverage for our events and meetings. Just asking the right questions of caterers can make choices healthier for attendees and save planners money.

Also top of mind for many in the sports events business is best use of time. The Accepted Practices Exchange (APEX) initiatives helps meeting and event planners organize their responsibilities, and the WEC session on APEX Savings Time helped explain the best use of this industry standard.

Want to use more video but aren’t sure how to go about it? “Video=Euphoric Results” offered great tips on using videos in marketing plans in lieu of the unread email backup that frustrates both the planner, and the person wanting more information.

“The MPI World Education Congress is my go to event each year for education and best practices for the meetings and events industry,” says Beth Hecquet, CMP, CMM, Director of Meetings and Events for the National Association of Sports Commissions.  “The 2014 sessions were exceptional and I have brought back to the NASC offices innovative ideas to try and information to guide us as we plan the 2015 NASC Symposium in Milwaukee next April.”



Categories: National

Prospecting in the NASC Sports Event Marketplace

Mon, 08/18/2014 - 10:26

Let’s talk for a few minutes about Sports Event Marketplaces. The NASC developed the first Sports Event Marketplace in the late nineties and since then it’s become an intricate part of the NASC Annual Sports Event Symposium. And looking at the recent responses from our meeting in Oklahoma City, we can tell that your interest in the sports marketplace is as high as or higher than ever, and it turns out to be the number one reason why many of you attend the symposium and we understand that. One of the questions I would ask you though is to determine for yourself whether you’re prepared for the sports marketplace before you begin. And now we’re talking from the cities point of view, because one of the concerns, I personally have is, that many of you are relatively inexperienced in the industry are expecting to go to the Sports Event Marketplace and pick up business in 10 to 12 minutes, when you’re not even sure whether your destination can host the events you’re talking about. How do you fix that?

First, don’t go to a Sports Event Marketplace until you know the kinds of events you can host, and which age groups, and why. And if you don’t know that, you’re going to have to find somebody to help you determine what you can do before you talk to anybody. Because what happens is, a very simple prophecy is fulfilled if you don’t know whether you can handle the event or not, and you show the event owner in a sports marketplace appointment that that’s the case, what you’re doing is losing the business, rather than gaining the business.

What’s a proper approach to a sports marketplace appointment? Be prepared, be absolutely ready with what you can do and don’t take appointments with people who have events that you can’t handle. How do you find out where these events are? You go to the Rights Holder section of our database and you can find hundreds of event owners, and you can determine by sport which ones you ought to be talking to. And it makes common sense, to go ahead and do your homework before you go to the marketplace, at all.

Now, there has been some thought about restricting appointments at the marketplace to people who have been members and have attended the symposium for at least two years, and not have marketplace appointments with new people. That, of course, is not what we are going to do. Instead, I think you’re going to find the NASC to rely itself increasingly on Rapid RFP Review sessions; where an event rights holder meets with 10 or 12, or 15 of you at one time, “Here’s what we’ve got, this is what we’re looking for, go off do your homework. When you know you have it, get in touch with us, let’s talk then.” That’s a great way to do this. What is not a great way is to say to yourself before you arrive on-site for a sports marketplace series of appointments, is all I have to do to be successful in this business is to have a bunch of appointments, talk to a bunch of people, I’ll make friends and they’ll want to do business with me.” That’s not the way this business works, never has, never will, and it will be a waste of your time and a waste of the other event owners time, also.

I wish you well in all of your marketplace appointments, but I also, would wish preparation and the understanding that in 10 to 12 minutes you can lose a relationship faster than you can gain one. It is a terrific way to go back and say hi to old friends and acquaintances, and remind them that you are still interested in doing business with them. It is a terrible way to show people that you’re too new to know what’s going on.

Video blog: Don Schumacher, CSEE, Executive Director
National Association of Sports Commissions
513.281.3888     –     http://www.sportscommissions.org 
Published  August 18, 2014


Categories: National

NASC Best Practices Webinar on Defining the Roles of Sports Commissions and Convention & Visitors Bureaus Scheduled for Tuesday, August 26

Thu, 08/14/2014 - 13:07

Are you wondering whether your community should develop a sports commission? Maybe you find yourself asking, what is the difference between a sports commission and a convention and visitors bureau? What about funding– how do you raise the money needed to fund a sports commission? 

Join Don Schumacher, CSEE, Executive Director, National Association of Sports Commissions as he discussed the difference between a sports commission and a convention and visitors bureau, as well as sustainable funding sources to help keep your organization alive.     If you missed our recent video blog on Defining the Roles of Sports Commissions and Convention & Visitors Bureaus, be sure to check it out prior to August 26th, as Don will dive further into detail during the webinar!   About Don: Don Schumacher, CSEE has 50 years of experience in the fields of communications, family entertainment, theme park marketing and operations, arena and stadium marketing and operations, event management, sports marketing and facilities consultation. For the past 30 years he has focused his activities on the sports event travel market and has consulted with more than fifty cities on strategies to increase their share of this market.
Categories: National

NASC and its members featured in this week’s SportsBusiness Journal: The Big Business of Sports Tourism

Thu, 08/07/2014 - 10:09

The NASC and many of our members are featured in an 18-page special advertising section in this week’s SportsBusiness Journal. The section highlights the evolution of sports tourism and the history of NASC and its members as the pioneers for sports-related travel.

Special thanks to all of our members who supported the issue as advertisers:

  • Greater Columbus Sports Commission
  • Sioux Falls CVB
  • Oklahoma City CVB
  • Greater Raleigh Sports Alliance
  • Frisco CVB
  • Palm Beach County Sports Commission
  • Birmingham CVB
  • The Sports Facilities Advisory
  • Maryland Sports
  • VisitPittsburgh
  • Elizabethtown Sports Park
  • Visit Jacksonville
  • Massachusetts Sports Marketing Office
  • Myrtle Beach Sports Center
  • Rocky Top Sports World
  • Pensacola Sports Association

Be sure to check it out now!


Categories: National

Truckload Rate Quotes Now Available Through PartnerShip

Mon, 08/04/2014 - 05:00


PartnerShip®, the company that manages the NASC Shipping Program, offers competitive rates on full and partial truckload shipments to all NASC members! PartnerShip has created relationships with dozens of national and regional truckload carriers to help you save time and money. Even when your freight shipment is a full or partial truckload, requires specialized equipment, or is being exported or imported – PartnerShip has the connections to help you with a solution.

Truckload Freight Services:

  • Partial/volume loads (5,000-9,999 lbs.)
  • Full truckloads (>10,000 lbs.)
  • Solo or team truckload services
  • Dedicated, expedited or intermodal
  • Dry van, flat bed or refrigerated
  • Reputable carriers, including Schneider National, Swift Transport, U.S. Xpress, Werner, Con-way Truckload, Celadon Trucking, J.B. Hunt, R+L Truckload, and many more

Receive a competitive rate on your truckload shipment by visiting PartnerShip.com/TLQuote today. There, you can request a free, no-obligation quote for your dry van, refrigerated or flatbed truckload shipment.

This tip is brought to you by PartnerShip, the company that manages the NASC Shipping Program. For more information email sales@PartnerShip.com or call 800-599-2902.


Categories: National

NASC Board of Directors Meets for Summer Retreat

Tue, 07/22/2014 - 13:16

Membership services and professional development were two of the main topics covered at the 2014 National Association of Sports Commissions Board of Directors Summer Retreat, held July 16-18 at the National Collegiate Athletic Association’s office in downtown Indianapolis.

The meeting is the yearly opportunity for the Board to discuss topics that affect the long-term growth and viability of the NASC, and how NASC can best serve its members.

“We see the summer retreat as a great way to proactively look at the issues facing the NASC and its member organizations,” said Kevin Smith, CSEE, director of the St. Petersburg/ Clearwater Sports Commission and the chair of the Board of Directors. “We use this time to discuss some of the ways we can help our members be even more productive.”

Topics during the retreat included CSEE and professional development for members, Association meetings and events, and new membership services.

The Board also heard from Mark Lewis, executive vice president for championships and alliances of the NCAA, on the changing environment of college sports.

“These topics affect how our membership does business in the competitive sports tourism industry,” said Greg Ayers, CSEE, president and CEO of Discover Kalamazoo and Vice Chair/Chair-Elect of the Board. “The Board wants to find new ways, from education to networking, to help our members establish themselves as leaders in this field.”

The next professional development opportunity for members is the CSEE Fall Module and Market Segment Meetings, co-located with the USOC Olympic Sportslink at the Hilton Chicago on Monday, September 22 and Tuesday, September 23. For information and registration, visit http://sportscommissions.org/MarketSegmentMeetings.

Jackie Reau
Game Day Communications
700 West Pete Rose Way
Cincinnati, Ohio 45203

(513) 929-4263, office
(513) 708-5822, mobile
(513) 929-0245, fax

jreau@gamedaypr.com
www.gamedaypr.com
LinkedIn: JackieReau
Facebook: JackieReau
Twitter:@JackieReau


Categories: National

Sports Commissions vs. Convention & Visitors Bureaus

Mon, 07/14/2014 - 11:30

We’re often asked, should we develop a sports commission into our marketplace?  What’s the difference between a sports commission, and convention and visitors bureau?  I would like to refer all of you that are members of the NASC to this report which is available in the member’s only section of our website under Research and Reports where we carefully define the separate roles of a sports commission and convention and visitors bureau.  We think that’s a great first place when you consider whether a sports commission is going to be right for your market or not.

But beyond that, once you’ve understood the fundamental differences between a sports commission and a CVB the big issue that you need to come down to is funding, because a sports commission, if it is not part of a convention and visitors bureau, is going to have to figure out what kinds of sources are in the community for sustainable funding to keep that organization alive.  Clearly, if you decide that your sports commission or your sports authority is going to be a department of you convention and visitors bureau the funding with doubtless come primarily from the hotel tax that is levied in your marketplace.  But if you’re an independent and we have about eighty sports commissions in the United States that are independent from convention and visitors bureaus, then funding becomes the single biggest issue.  So, before you get started down the road of a sports commission establish the kind of budget you think you need and then address the real hard question of, can we raise that kind of money?  Because there’ll often be 300, 400, 500 thousand dollars to fund a sports commission in a marketplace, when you stop to think of an annual budget in a convention and visitors bureau it’s easy to understand that a sports commission could require investments of that size.  Now not all sports commissions are that big, some are much smaller, but it depends on the role that you expect the sports commission to play in your marketplace.  Fundraising can come from corporate community members, and one of the key differentiators in your market is the number of headquarters organizations versus the number of branch offices.  A branch office will never be able to support you as effectively as the home headquarters of an organization will, that is in your community and dedicated to what’s good and what’s growing in your community, and I think you can all understand that.

The room tax is a second possibility for funding; some sports commissions even though they’re independent of a convention bureau receive some portion of their funding from the convention bureau in recognition for the room nights that they are producing in the community.  There are also some sports commissions in the United States that have become a line item in the city or county budget, where they actually receive a set amount of money each year.  Of course they have to go back and fight for that money in every new budget process, but some public funding is available from time to time for communities.

Memberships, charging memberships for both corporations and individuals are ways in which some sports commissions have funded their operations, and also fundraisers.  Whether it’s a series of luncheons, an annual sports banquet where you celebrate the value of sport in your community and bring in a high powered speaker, and try to raise substantial amounts of money.  And never forget the fact that sports commission have the ability to put themselves in their own budgets, and when the day is done and the events over, an amount of money can be transferred from the event account to the sports commission account, in recognition for the contribution that the sports commission has made.

So, as we conclude, a couple of things to keep in mind: number one if you’re going to create a sports commission dedicated lines of funding are all important, and number two, sports commissions don’t always consider room  nights as the single most essential reason for their being.  Most sports commissions, frankly, and this is true in this report, and its pointed out here, and we tried to point it out very clearly, most sports commissions are thinking about quality of life issues for their community.  They love room nights, but they are really looking for events that are going to make a difference in the lives of the people in their community, and not necessarily the events that will produce the largest number of room nights.

We hope these thoughts on sports commissions and convention and visitors bureaus are helpful to you.  Certainly we’d be happy to answer your questions at anytime, just call us here in Cincinnati and we’d be happy to talk about it.

Video blog: Don Schumacher, CSEE, Executive Director
National Association of Sports Commissions
513.281.3888     –     http://www.sportscommissions.org 
Published  July 14, 2014


Categories: National
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