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Five Vikings minicamp storylines that we will have our eyes on

Star Tribune Sports - Mon, 06/15/2015 - 15:26
The Vikings wrap up their offseason workout program this week and set the stage for training camp with their three-day mandatory minicamp. With Adrian Peterson back in the fold, there is not much drama for the Vikings, who have had a quiet offseason beyond the Peterson saga. But that doesn’t mean there won’t be intrigue out at Winter Park starting Tuesday. Unfortunately, the minicamp is not open to the public. But media can watch all three days. Here are five storylines we’ll keep our eyes on for you. 1. Who will line up with first-team offensive line? The configuration of the line for Week 1 won’t be determined until training camp and the preseason, when the linemen will actually be in pads. But this week’s minicamp could give us a hint about the preferred quintet. Matt Kalil and Brandon Fusco have manned the left side of the line this spring with John Sullivan anchoring the line at center. Michael Harris seems to be a placeholder at right tackle until the injured Phil Loadholt can return to team drills. The right guard spot, though, has been a revolving door, with T.J. Clemmings, Tyrus Thompson and David Yankey all getting snaps with the ones. Will one of them seize pole position heading into training camp? 2. Will any of the injured starters return this week? Loadholt is not fully back after undergoing pectoral surgery last November. Defensive end Brian Robison injured his pectoral early in the spring and has been sidelined. Linebacker Anthony Barr has been out with a mystery ailment (it’s not his knee, we know that much). And cornerback Captain Munnerlyn injured his foot at the start of OTAs. Head coach Mike Zimmer is hopeful that those guys will take steps forward in their recoveries this week. Of those four, the injuries to Robison and Barr are most concerning. 3. Can Cordarrelle Patterson get back with the ones? Throughout the spring workouts open to media, the Vikings consistently ran wide receivers Mike Wallace, Charles Johnson and Jarius Wright with the first-team offense. Patterson was with the second-stringers, usually snagging passes from backup quarterback Shaun Hill. Has Patterson made enough strides to get another chance to click with Teddy Bridgewater? 4. Where will top draft pick Trae Waynes be lining up? Zimmer isn’t handing anything to Waynes. The young cornerback has mostly been with the second unit and has been getting a significant amount of snaps in the slot instead of on the outside. Waynes will be in the mix to start this summer — maybe sooner than later with a strong minicamp. 5. Who will have a leg up in the competition at safety? Robert Blanton, despite losing his starting job to Andrew Sendejo late last season, was back next to Harrison Smith in the spring workouts open to the media. Will he keep hogging all the first-team reps or will Sendejo, Taylor Mays or intriguing second-year safety Antone Exum get opportunities?
Categories: Local

Jarvis Johnson will not be cleared to play for Minnesota

Star Tribune Sports - Mon, 06/15/2015 - 13:34
Guard Jarvis Johnson – who will still attend the university on scholarship -- suffers from a condition that caused his heart to stop for somewhere between eight to 10 minutes in 2010.
Categories: Local

Byron Buxton and the Paradox of Potential

Star Tribune Sports - Mon, 06/15/2015 - 11:59
I came to this spot with honest intentions of writing solely about a 21-year-old baseball phenom, but it’s clear I’m instead in one of those dangerous places – fueled by pleasure reading, that rarest of things these days – where larger thoughts are intersecting with smaller ones. If you came here looking for a dissection of a swing, a pleasant talk about OPS or even just a fawning hero’s welcome … sorry, this is not that place. And so: I’m reading “Excellent Sheep: The Miseducation of the American Elite and the Way to a Meaningful Life,” a scathing critique of the current elite university education system and the perfect (but perfectly bereft of true direction or soul) students it is churning out these days. It is written by William Deresiewicz, a former Yale professor. I am not done with it, but I can already tell it is excellent. One particular passage early on struck me: “A former student sent me an essay he wrote, a few years after college, called ‘The Paradox of Potential.’ Yale students, he said, are like stem cells. They can be anything in the world, so they try to delay for as long as possible the moment when they have to become just one thing in particular. Possibility, paradoxically, becomes limitation.” In the larger context of life, I see this paralysis of possibility playing out on a daily basis – even with myself. The world has become so large and so small at once that there exist limitless choices. But within those limitless choices comes the infinite chance that you might pick the wrong thing. So we have become a nation (and I imagine it extends beyond our borders) of dabblers, poking our toes into the water long enough to get wet but not long enough to go for a swim. And we have become a nation that covets a herd even at a time when we’ve never had more freedom. It is felt in something as mundane as deciding where to have dinner or what to do on a particular evening. We are afraid to fail, and we are afraid to appear anything less than perfect. We constantly compare ourselves to others because Twitter, Instagram and Facebook give us that kind of instant feedback and comparative one-upping space. Sure, you had a nice weekend. But did you have a nice enough weekend? Because a lot of people ate well, drank well and traveled well. Are you really that cool? Are you afraid to admit you might not be? And so we sit, sometimes, frozen – grabbing onto whatever we can hold, going all-in only on sure things, trying not to get left behind – and surely terrified. For students – who have been prepping for big things their whole lives by working themselves to the nub without understanding at all what they’re working toward — Deresiewicz finds this manifests itself in passionless careers that check all the right boxes for a middle-to-upper-middle-class existence. Because school hasn’t been providing knowledge; it has merely been providing a track. This fear of failure has nothing to do with Byron Buxton, and it has everything to do with Byron Buxton – or more specifically, the modern Minnesota sports fan and how he or she sees Byron Buxton. This is a type of fandom that explains the meteoric rise in all things off-field, to the point now that I’m not even sure sometimes why they play the games. Surely the ESPN hype machine has helped sell the NFL Draft, but they’re not exactly peddling ice cubes at the North Pole. They’ve tapped into the seduction of possibilities that drives the modern 20-somethings and 30-somethings (yes, I’m still a part of this), and there’s no greater fodder for this than an event where every team gets better, every team can be compared against the other, and everybody is 0-0. It’s a safe place where you might get angry, but you won’t have your heart broken. Free agency and trade speculation are more of the same — events that allow our imaginations to run wild without any real danger. Even advanced statistics, which are wonderful, crazy and terrible all at once, are a concerted effort to find order in the chaos and absolute truth regardless of what happens on the field – to find the highest probabilities in the best of times, to have a scapegoat in the math in the worst of times. Me? No. I was not wrong. I did not fail. The numbers said … And now Byron Buxton.  For three years now, all we’ve known is this young prospect who will someday be so very, very good for the Twins. He is part of a new wave that will save everything and make life better. He’ll be Kirby Puckett and Mike Trout rolled into one, only faster. And all this losing? Wait. Just wait. We expect Buxton to be so many great things and are excited to find out if he can be so many great things. But now that he is here, it is clear that we are also so terrified to find out. It is clear from the tension on Twitter, broken only by ironic jokes that also show a level of terror. It is clear when Bert Blyleven awkwardly blurts out “send him down!” as a joke after Buxton strikes out in his first at-bat. Because not knowing, and simply believing in the track record, the numbers, the high draft position — that was a sure thing. This is real life now. These are real major league pitches. This is the harsh reality of a player who goes 0-for-4 with two strikeouts in his debut, mixed with the breathtaking speed that so easily scores the winning run. We’re past potential now, into the dirty world of reality. If Buxton is as great as we all believe he will be, he will fail thousands of times. If he’s less than great, he won’t get the chance to fail as much. If that’s not a lesson that failing doesn’t make you a failure, I don’t know what is. The only failure is being to scared to try. I just hope we can try to push aside the fear and enjoy watching Buxton become whatever he is.
Categories: Local

Report: U.S. Bank to get naming rights for Vikings stadium

Star Tribune Sports - Mon, 06/15/2015 - 11:34
Neither the Vikings nor the bank will comment on the report, but sources said an official announcement is planned for next week.
Categories: Local

Twins official scorer: He's by-the-book and yet a nonconformist

Star Tribune Sports - Sun, 06/14/2015 - 21:51
Official scorer Stew Thornley is a nonconformist and proud of it.
Categories: Local

Byron Buxton's Twins debut: a start-to-finish blur

Star Tribune Sports - Sun, 06/14/2015 - 21:34
Byron Buxton’s whirlwind day finishes with game-winning dash
Categories: Local

Postgame: Hicks can relate to Buxton's challenge

Star Tribune Sports - Sun, 06/14/2015 - 21:15
Patrolling the outfielder no problem for Twins' rookie; Molitor bats him ninth to help ease the transition.
Categories: Local

FIFA bluntly warns Blatter to not renege on resignation

Star Tribune Sports - Sun, 06/14/2015 - 19:55
Reacting to a Swiss newspaper report, FIFA official Domenico Scala said reform hinges on Sepp Blatter leaving office.
Categories: Local

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